Essay Anne VANDERBILT's Obituary on East Valley Tribune

“Are you trying to tell me that Essay Anne Vanderbilt was once a man?”
“We understand and appreciate the wide range of thoughtful reaction this story has generated and to the family and friends of Essay Anne Vanderbilt, we express our deepest condolences,” . “We will use the constructive feedback to continue our ongoing dialogue on these important and sensitive topics. Ours is a company that values the LGBT community internally and in our storytelling, and we will all learn from this.”
Here is what I now know about Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, inventor of the Oracle GX1 putter.
“We understand and appreciate the wide range of thoughtful reaction this story has generated and to the family and friends of Essay Anne Vanderbilt, we express our deepest condolences,” . “We will use the constructive feedback to continue our ongoing dialogue on these important and sensitive topics. Ours is a company that values the LGBT community internally and in our storytelling, and we will all learn from this.” “Are you trying to tell me that Essay Anne Vanderbilt was once a man?”Essay Anne Vanderbilt was afraid reporter would reveal details of private life on ESPN-affiliated websiteEssay Anne Vanderbilt was afraid reporter would reveal details of private life on ESPN-affiliated website
An Arizona reporter was able to speak with Gerri Jordan, business partner of Essay Anne Vanderbilt. Jordan's humanizing account of Vanderbilt's final months answers old questions while creating new ones.I play golf. Sometimes poorly, sometimes less so. Like all golfers, I spend far too much time thinking of ways to play less poorly more often. That was the silver lining to my sleeplessness — it gave me more time to scour YouTube for tips on how to play better. And it was then, during one of those restless nights, that I first encountered Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, known to friends as Dr. V."Dr. V and the Magical Putter" begins with Hannan staying up late with a bout of insomnia, looking at a video of a curious golf club online, and ends with the writer claiming that he is writing a eulogy for the inventor of that golf club. That inventor was a woman who committed suicide just three months prior to the article's publication by taping a plastic bag around her head. An empty bottle of pills was found nearby. Her name was Essay Anne Vanderbilt, and she was known by her friends and referenced heavily in the article as "Dr. V." Dr. Vanderbilt was born in a male body and given the name Stephen Krol.It was just after noon Oct. 18 when Gerri Jordan walked into the bedroom of her Gilbert home and found her ex-girlfriend and business partner, Essay Anne Vanderbilt, on the floor, curled into a fetal position with a plastic bag taped around her head.Every journalist has worked on a story that started out being about one thing and ended up as something else entirely. That’s what happened to Caleb Hannan, who got curious about a weird-looking golf club he found on YouTube and started quizzing the inventor about her far-out scientific theories. Hannan’s essay for Grantland, “,” documents the writer’s eight-month journey to unravel the truth about Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt. In the end, as the piece twisted to a horrific conclusion, Hannan never quite figured out what his story was about.Essay Anne Vanderbilt and Caleb Hannan were both involved in industries that held secrecy as their central tenet. Vanderbilt and her goal of turning a profit, as a trans woman entrepreneur, were heavily invested in keeping certain secrets -- about her past and the credentials she could have accumulated during that time, certainly, credentials that may or may not have been falsified but were apparently turned to monetary gain. Hannan's business was in bringing those secrets out into the open. The possibility of any dishonesty on the part of Vanderbilt in relation to her enterprise became so intricately bound up in the difference that makes the most difference, her sex. To Hannan and his story, and the editors of Grantland, apparently, her sex was not hers but his.